Linked: Fast Software, the Best Software by Craig Mod

· Planning, Product · Patrick Smith

Speed and reliability are often intuited hand-in-hand. Speed can be a good proxy for general engineering quality. If an application slows down on simple tasks, then it can mean the engineers aren’t obsessive detail sticklers. Not always, but it can mean disastrous other issues lurk.

But why is slow bad? Fast software is not always good software, but slow software is rarely able to rise to greatness. Fast software gives the user a chance to “meld” with its toolset. That is, not break flow. When the nerds upon Nerd Hill fight to the death over Vi and Emacs, it’s partly because they have such a strong affinity for the flow of the application and its meldiness. They have invested. The Tool Is Good, so they feel. Not breaking flow is an axiom of great tools.

Lots of great points in this post from Craig Mod. It can be contrasted with the point that I don’t believe teams should prematurely optimize or prioritize application speed over meeting user needs.

However — if an application is noticeably slow, especially for common tasks, I will feel annoyed every time I use it. It feels as though a shortcut has been taken for the development team’s benefit (and not mine), or maybe they just don’t know what they’re doing.

Mazda removes touchscreens from its cars

· Design, Product · Patrick Smith

“Doing our research, when a driver would reach towards a touch-screen interface in any vehicle, they would unintentionally apply torque to the steering wheel, and the vehicle would drift out of its lane position,” said Matthew Valbuena, Mazda North America’s lead engineer for HMI and infotainment.

“And of course with a touchscreen you have to be looking at the screen while you’re touching…so for that reason we were comfortable removing the touch-screen functionality,” he added.

The head-up display that top trims of the Mazda 3 get is now projected onto the windshield. The amount of time it takes the eyes to focus on the head-up display is greatly reduced because it’s now focused on a point 7.5 feet ahead of the driver.

I think this shows that just because a technology seems better (touchscreens are in all our phones!) or is newer (everything analogue should become more digital over time!) does not mean it will be a better user experience.

Read the article here